Special sessions

Special sessions provide the opportunity to focus in detail on particular emerging topics, which are not covered in the conference’s main technical tracks, and/or to represent a specific progressive area where researchers would like to meet and discuss advances.

The deadline for proposing special sessions has now passed. Session organisers can find instructions here.

Special sessions

The list of approved special sessions for ISIE 2020 is as follows. Details for each session can be found below.

  1. Advanced Topologies and Control Techniques for Multilevel Converters
  2. Magnetic Design, Implementation and Analysis for Next Generation Power Converters
  3. Advances in Data-Driven Process Monitoring and Control for Complex Industrial Systems
  4. Coordinated Operation and Planning of Hybrid Energy Systems
  5. Advanced Technologies for DC Microgrid Plug-and-Play Operations
  6. PV systems and other Distributed Energy Resources in grids: challenges, monitoring, and power quality assessment
  7. Emerging Topics in More Power Electronics Grid
  8. Theory and Technology on Human Factors
  9. Advanced Technologies Based 100% Renewable Power Generation
  10. Wireless Charging of Electric Vehicles
  11. Sensorless Control Issues of Electrical Drives and Machines
  12. Advanced Control of Grid-Connected Inverters for Power Quality and Renewable Energy Integration
  13. Energy Storage Systems for Resilience and Robustness Improvement in Smart Grid and Electric Mobility
  14. Frequency and time measurements in industrial applications
  15. Portable and Smart Solution of Power Electronics for High Voltage Conversion with Renewable Energy and Grid Integration
  16. Machine Vision, Control and Navigation
  17. Challenges and solutions towards 100% power electronic converter-based power systems
  18. Z-Source Converters; Topologies, Modulation and Control Strategies, and their Applications
  19. Internet of Things (IoT) and Wireless Sensors
  20. High-Power Converters: Topologies, Modulation Techniques, and Applications
  21. Charging electric vehicles from renewable energy and ultrafast charging of EV
  22. Fault Tolerant Converters for Medium and Low Voltage Applications

Special session details

1: Advanced Topologies and Control Techniques for Multilevel Converters

  • Mohammad Sharifzadeh, ETS, Montreal, Canada
  • Fadia Sebaaly, Saint-Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon
  • Mohammad Babaie, ETS, Montreal, Canada
  • Kamal Al-Haddad, ETS, Montreal, Canada
  • Hadi Kanaan, Saint-Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon

Multilevel converters including DC/AC and AC/DC are nowadays used in various industrial, commercial, and domestic applications such as grid-connected systems, rectifiers, active power filter, UPS, electrical drives, etc. This converter makes use of abundant number of power semiconductor devices that should be properly controlled to have maximum efficiency. The primary challenge is to find appropriate topology, design the suitable PWM switching techniques, and apply the appropriate controller. Moreover, since the multilevel converters have nonlinear character, closed loop based system using advanced controllers such as sliding mode, model predictive, adaptive, intelligent methods to meet the targeted application. Therefore, this special session concentrates on the lasts development of multilevel converters topologies, control and device switching techniques but not limited to:

  • PWM modulation technique for multilevel inverters
  • Innovative and intelligent closed loop control strategies
  • Novel current based control design for renewable energy generation using grid-connected converters
  • Recent development techniques for common mode voltage control and drives application
  • Industrial applications in the area of power quality, electrification and transportation, UPS, etc.

2: Magnetic Design, Implementation and Analysis for Next Generation Power Converters

  • Wilmar Martinez, KU Leuven, Belgium
  • Kazuhiro Umetani, Okayama University, Japan
  • Jun Imaoka, Nagoya University, Japan

Magnetic design, implementation, and analysis have been seen as a classical topic compared with the advances in semiconductor devices and converter topologies. However, currently, magnetics is seen as a key factor for higher efficiency, stable performance, and volume reduction in electric systems. Moreover, with the introduction of wide bandgap devices like silicon carbide and gallium nitride, better magnetic design is currently demanded. In this context, many top leading power electronics researchers are working on a great number of challenges in magnetics and making breakthroughs towards next generation of power converters. This special session aims at covering recent advances in magnetics technology for cutting-edge power converters and thereby fostering further innovation that will conduct the future of power electronics. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Inductor and transformer design and optimization for high frequency power converters.
  • New integrated magnetic circuit and its application.
  • Iron loss modelling of steel laminations, ferrites, SMC, nanocrystalline, Amorphous, etc.
  • Measurement and characterization techniques of inductance and power losses.
  • Advanced magnetic materials.
  • Copper loss reduction in windings (PCB, Litz, flat wires, tape wires, etc.).
  • Coil design for wireless power transfer and induction heating.
  • Analytical and numerical optimization of the magnetic structure.
  • High power density implementation of magnetic devices in power converters.
  • 3D printing of magnetic materials for inductors and transformers.

3: Advances in Data-Driven Process Monitoring and Control for Complex Industrial Systems

  • Hao Luo, Harbin Institute of Technology, China
  • Zhiwen Chen, Central South University, China
  • Chao Cheng, Tsinghua University, China
  • Okyay Kaynak, Bogazici University, Turkey

In recent years, driven by the rapid advancements in electronics, information and communication technology, disruptive changes are taking place in the industrial environment. Due to the ever-increasing demands on product quality and economic benefit, not only are intelligent components and devices implemented and networked, but real-time supervision and control systems are also running in parallel. Consequently, the degree of automation in modern industrial systems is continuously growing. This fact challenges scientists and engineers to develop advanced process monitoring and control methodologies, using offline, stored, or online process data to solve optimal process monitoring and control issues. This Special Session aims to provide a forum for researchers and industrial engineers to exchange their latest results on data-driven process monitoring and control techniques, and to discuss the vital issues, challenges and possible future trends in modern large-scale industrial systems. The papers to be accepted in this Special Session are expected to provide the latest developments in data-driven design approaches, especially new theoretical results with practical applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Data-driven process monitoring approaches and applications.
  • Model-free or data-driven control design approaches and applications.
  • Data-driven performance evaluation, diagnosis, decisions and their applications.
  • Data-driven optimization methods and applications.
  • Real-time model-free learning methods and practical applications.

4: Coordinated Operation and Planning of Hybrid Energy Systems

  • Behnam Mohammadi-ivatloo, University of Tabriz, Iran
  • Amjad Anvari-Moghaddam, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Somayeh Asadi, Penn State University, Pennsylvania, USA

The development of hybrid energy systems’ technologies has grown their presence in human life more than ever. This issue has increasingly driven the current energy supply systems to change from the individual sub-systems with separate energy vectors to the incorporated infrastructure by creating the linkage between different energy networks. The created inevitable dependency between the electrical, gas and heat networks has introduced a great need for evaluating the technical issues by considering the coupled version of their structure. Due to this, a significant gap is felt for coordinated operation and planning of the hybrid energy networks for effectively responding to the challenges ahead of this field. This Special Session is to provide a forum for researchers and individual engineers to contribute in exchanging their latest results on the coordinated operation and planning of the energy networks with the aim of properly overcoming the challenges of the today’s and future power systems. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Optimal planning of the Hybrid Energy Networks (HEN)
  • Expert energy management systems for coordinating HEN
  • Optimal operation of the hybrid energy systems
  • Application of the multi-energy storage systems in the HEN
  • Energy management techniques in the HEN
  • Multi-regional energy development plans for the HEN
  • The role of conversion-based technologies in the HEN
  • Demand side management in HEN
  • Uncertainty management in HEN

5: Advanced Technologies for DC Microgrid Plug-and-Play Operations

  • Zhengyu Lin, Loughborough University, UK
  • Fei Wang, Shanghai University, China
  • Laura Ramirez Elizondo, TU Delft, Netherlands

Microgrids is a system approach to enable more distributed renewable generation in the power system. Compared with AC systems, DC microgrids have the advantages of lower cost, higher reliability, efficiency and simpler control. Plug-and-Play operation is one of the challenges for DC microgrid applications and is becoming an emerging research topic over the last a few years. In this context, this special session will bring together researchers from academia and industry to share and exchange experiences and state-of-the-art technologies for Plug-and-Play DC microgrid operation, explore enabling technologies of power converter design, system modelling, control, protection, optimisation, and demonstration. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Modelling and simulation of DC microgrids
  • Adaptive & collaborative control of DC microgrid Power converters
  • DC microgrid instability analysis and stable control algorithms
  • Advanced control of DC microgrids
  • Protection of DC microgrids
  • DC microgrid system optimisation strategy
  • DC microgrid applications
  • DC microgrid demonstration systems and sites

6: PV systems and other Distributed Energy Resources in grids: challenges, monitoring, and power quality assessment

  • Sónia Pinto, IST, INESC-ID, Portugal
  • Cédric Caruana, University of Malta, Malta
  • Grazia Barchi, EURAC Research, Italy
  • John Licari, University of Malta, Malta
  • Jonathan Leloux, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
  • Marios Theristis, Sandia National Laboratories, USA

The high penetration of PVs in medium and low voltage distribution grids is creating some challenges in the grid management and operation as reverse power flow, Power Quality (PQ) issues, and increased complexity in the definition of protection settings. Problems as voltage rise, frequency variation and high frequency harmonic emission are more likely and might result in the noncompliance with international standards. Therefore, to overcome these issues new approaches to integrate these and other Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) in the grid are required. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Small and large-scale integration of PV systems in the grid
  • Power quality monitoring in PVs and DERs
  • Power Quality issues and mitigating solutions
  • Integration of energy storage systems with PV plants
  • Power converter topologies, modulation and control strategies for grid connected PV systems and other Distributed Energy Resources (DERs)
  • Contribution of small-scale PV inverters to distribution system voltage control
  • Limitation of PV plant output power ramp rates
  • Demand response applications for PV systems and other DERs in smart grids
  • Efficiency and reliability of PV inverters

7: Emerging Topics in More Power Electronics Grid

  • Zian Qin, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • Dongsheng Yang, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands

Nowadays, due to the increasing demand of renewables and high power quality, more power is processed by power electronics prior to injecting into or drawing from the grid compared with decades ago. Meanwhile, power generations are getting more distributed and less dispatchable. As a consequence, the power grid is getting relatively less stiff, and thereby the interactions between the grid and the grid-tied power electronics are becoming stronger. These interactions have been reflected by some unusual phenomena, such as the sustained or amplified inter-harmonics in a wide frequency range, more-frequent grid faults nearby wind farms or solar farms and higher ROCOF of grid frequency. To tackle these new challenges, new theories and models need to be developed to understand the phenomena, new converter control, and design criteria need to be established for better grid supporting capabilities, new grid codes are needed to ensure the grid can handle more power electronics. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Modelling, analysis, and control of wind/solar farms, or on-board grids
  • Black-box impedance measurement of the weak grid or grid-tied converters
  • Ancillary services of grid-tied energy storage systems
  • Fault ride through, black start, etc., of more power electronics grids
  • Control and design of new grid infrastructure and end-uses, such solid-state-transformer, STATCOM, fast-charging station, data centre
  • Advanced control strategies for more robust and smart grids

8: Theory and Technology on Human Factors

  • Sho Yokota, Toyo University, Japan
  • Jinhua She, Tokyo University of Technology, Japan
  • Daisuke Chugo, Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan

Human Factors has been primarily key concept to develop production systems, and then it is expanding to the field of human system interaction. Needless to say, human factors includes not only physical aspects but also psychology aspects. For designing the system based on human factor, it basically depends on various sensing and control technologies. In particular, robotics and intelligent system are core technology fields. The organizers, therefore, propose a Special Session to discuss some case studies with focusing on robotics, intelligent system, human support system and technologies enabling real world operation. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Health-care system
  • Human-system interaction
  • Human-support system
  • Human understanding
  • Human performance and modelling
  • Industrial engineering
  • Man-machine interface
  • Mechatronics and control
  • Robotics
  • Sensing and recognition

9: Advanced Technologies Based 100% Renewable Power Generation

  • Omar H. Abdalla, Helwan University, Egypt
  • Hady H. Fayek, Heliopolis University, Egypt
  • Thomas I. Strasser, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, Austria
  • Markus Makoschitz, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology

Renewable energies in many systems are hitting significant levels and there are many promising situations and targets. The world is now generating more than 20% of its electricity from renewable energies and targeting 100% renewable power generation by 2050. Iceland is already generating 100% of its electricity from renewable energy technologies. Also Norway and Costa Rica are generating more than 95% of their electric energies from renewables. Denmark and New York state in USA are targeting 50% renewable power generation by 2030. Upper-Egypt region in Egypt is now operating with 100% renewable energies mainly hydro and photovoltaic power stations.

To face the climate change, reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is a must. To reduce or eliminate those emissions, the current share of inverter-based power systems will even further increase which leads to new technical challenges and economic disputes. Advanced technologies such as artificial intelligence, modeling, design, validation approaches, real time control and self-healing will maximize the potential of integration of renewable sources and power electronics in state-of-the-art power grids. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Frequency control applications of low or zero inertia power systems / microgrids
  • Voltage control applications of power systems with high penetration level of renewables
  • Smart grid technologies based optimal operation of low inertia power systems
  • Modern protection applications on grids with high share of renewables
  • Artificial intelligence applications on grids with high share of renewable energies
  • Challenges and opportunities of 100% renewable energy power grids
  • Role of energy storage in low / zero inertia power systems / microgrids
  • Advanced modelling and design of inverter based smart grids.
  • Energy management systems of low inertia power systems
  • Ultra-high efficient and dynamic power electronics for enhanced services in smart grids
  • Integration of wide bandgap in renewables and smart grid applications

10: Wireless Charging of Electric Vehicles

  • Jianning Dong, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • Thiago Batista Soeiro , Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

The electrification of personal and public transportation has been an unavoidable trend. How to charge the increasing number of electric vehicles conveniently and efficiently becomes a technical challenge. Compared with the traditional charging via cables, wireless charging is gaining interest from both scientific and industrial communities. However, there are many technical challenges to solve to enable safe, reliable and efficient wireless charging, especially related to misalignment and electromagnetic field (EMF) radiation. This special session will focus on solving technical challenges in wireless charging of electric vehicles. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • High power wireless charging systems
  • Design and optimization of wireless charging systems
  • Dynamic wireless charging
  • EMF emission and human safety
  • Standardization and regulation of wireless charging
  • Foreign objects detection
  • Modelling, simulation and control of wireless charging systems
  • Metrology for wireless charging

11: Sensorless Control Issues of Electrical Drives and Machines

  • Imen Bahri, GeePs, University of Paris Saclay, France
  • Emanuele Grasso, LAT, Saarland University, Germany
  • Marco Palmieri, DEI, Politechnic of Bari, Italy

Sensorless algorithms for driving electrical drives and machines have found wide application either in substituting the necessary sensor or in providing redundant information in case of sensor’s failure. Largely adopted techniques are either based on the exploitation of the back-electromotive force or on the exploitation of machine anisotropies. Also, signal injection techniques have found large application especially in standstill, low speed range with maximum torque production region. The implementation of such techniques is also of main importance. This session is intended to be an opportunity for practitioners to exchange on the different methods and on their real-time implementation issues. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Model and Non Model-Based Speed Sensorless Control Techniques
  • Stability issues and dynamic performance of sensorless control
  • Rotor and stator geometry design for sensorless operation
  • FPGA-based implementation of sensorless controllers
  • DSP-based implementation of sensorless controllers
  • System-on-Chip (SoC) implementation of sensorless controllers
  • Observers for replacing existing sensors (voltage, current, …).

12: Advanced Control of Grid-Connected Inverters for Power Quality and Renewable Energy Integration

  • Hadi Y. Kanaan, Saint-Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon
  • Kamal Al-Haddad, Ecole de Technologie Supérieure, Montreal, Canada
  • Mohammad Sharifzadeh, Ecole de Technologie Supérieure, Montreal, Canada
  • Fadia Sebaaly, Saint-Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon

Renewable sources, such as photovoltaic panels, wind generators and fuel cells, are usually connected directly to the grid for cogeneration. This connection is made through power electronics interfaces that should ensure high stability, voltage regulation, power flow control, and low electromagnetic emission, along with high power density, low cost and high reliability. In some applications where high power level is required, the switching frequency of the power semiconductors is limited and the use of multilevel or interleaved converters becomes mandatory in order to get an acceptable power quality. This session addresses the issues of advanced control techniques applied to such converters to improve their performance, efficiency, reliability and cost-effectiveness. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Advanced control of multilevel inverters
  • Advanced control of power electronics in DC grids
  • Grid-connectivity control requirements
  • Control of paralleled or interleaved topologies
  • Modelling and model-based control of switch-mode power converters
  • Optimal control in hybrid cogeneration systems
  • Predictive control of power converters
  • Intelligent control of power converters
  • Direct power control of power converters
  • Power quality control in renewable energy systems
  • New PWM techniques for power electronics control
  • Real-time control and simulations of high power converters

13: Energy Storage Systems for Resilience and Robustness Improvement in Smart Grid and Electric Mobility

  • Alfonso Damiano, University of Cagliari, Italy
  • Chengbin Ma, University of Michigan-Shanghai, China
  • Federico Baronti, University of Pisa, Italy
  • Mo-Yuen Chow, North Carolina State University, USA

The fast and massive deployment of distributed generation and e-mobility based on smart and micro grid concepts is contributing to change the configuration of the energy system significantly. However, the power quality and energy management issues, related to intermittency of generation and electricity demand due to the integration of renewable energy sources and the e-mobility, are increasing the request of flexibility, dynamic performance, robustness and resilience in the energy management of microgrids. Energy Storage Systems (ESS) play a key role in this scenario both for the successful implementation of smart grids and for improving their robustness, reliability and resilience. The main objective of this special session is to share new developments in the design of ESSs and of their management/integration in the power system to improve the resilience and the robustness of both electric mobility, micro-grid and smart grid applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • State estimation diagnosis and prognostic algorithms for ESSs
  • Testing, modelling and ageing laws of ESSs
  • ESS Control algorithm oriented to increase robustness and resilience of Smart Grid and charging/discharging of electric vehicles;
  • Sizing and optimization of distributed ESS for robustness and resilience improvement;
  • ESS Fault diagnosis, monitoring, and aging estimation;
  • Fail safe architectures and safety management;
  • Predictive resilience analysis;
  • Resilience driven system design.

14: Frequency and time measurements in industrial applications

  • Oleg Sergiyenko, Engineering Institute of Autonomous University of Baja California, Mexico
  • Valerii Semenets, Kharkiv National University of Radio Electronics, Ukraine
  • Vladimir Kartashov, Kharkiv National University of Radio Electronics, Ukraine
  • Marina Kolendovska, Kharkiv National University of Radio Electronics, Ukraine

The integrated function of frequency and time domain measurements; novel theoretical methods for optimization of frequency domain sensors (FDS); frequency control in industrial applications; estimation of frequency long/short-term instabilities, jitter and drift; frequency domain techniques in various industrial applications, such as GPS, engineering 4.0, structural health monitoring, as well as navigation algorithms in robotic group, where the frequency control have become an important task for the most effective approaches of system optimization in the context of the task that is performed. Although our primary interest is in automatic systems in all their aspects, several control, communication and INS navigation applications have a close relation with these systems. Each contribution, applications or innovations for any of these fields are welcome in this special session. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Advances in classical frequency count methods.
  • Frequency measurements by rational approximations.
  • Frequency measurements by phase situation analysis.
  • Phase locked loop.
  • Fast Fourier Transform in frequency estimation.
  • Frequency and time synchronization in communication networks.
  • Frequency shifts in GPS applications.
  • Detection of structural damage through changes in frequency.
  • FDS.
  • INS.
  • Measurements/control of frequency stability.
  • Optical frequency metrology.
  • Time and frequency reference and primary standards.
  • Calibration and uncertainty of difference time scales.
  • Oscillators and clocks.
  • Estimation of accuracy characteristics.
  • Novel time and frequency measuring devices.
  • Measuring facilities for comparing remote clocks with frequency standards.
  • Mobile clocks.
  • Radio and optical facilities of time and frequency measurements.
  • Remote calibration (checking) of time and frequency measures.
  • Software for statistical processing the measurement results.

15: Portable and Smart Solution of Power Electronics for High Voltage Conversion with Renewable Energy and Grid Integration

  • Mahajan Sagar Bhaskar, Department of Communications and Networks Engineering, Prince Sultan University, Saudi Arabia
  • P. Sanjeevikumar, Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Jens Bo Holm-Nielsen, Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Frede Blaabjerg, Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, Denmark

Power electronics plays a fundamental role in renewable energy conversion and grid integration to control voltage/current and power flow in the conversion unit. The Power electronics converter system should be smart, efficient, reliable, easy to control, cheaper, small size, and have high power conversion capability and reduce number of components. Recently, numerous power electronics solution e.g. converter based on the switched inductor, switched capacitor, voltage multiplier, isolated transformer, quasi Z source etc. gain popularity to achieve high step-up voltage with high power conversion. Moreover, the smart placement of reactive components and semiconductor devices with proper selection of voltage and current rating are essential in reducing the size, cost, control of power conversion unit for economic installation and efficient operation. The current trends also focus on advance control technique to control power switches in an efficient way with reducing control circuitry or by using a smart controller. The primary objective of this special session is to flow the idea of the professional research group on a common platform, to present recent power electronics solution for renewable and grid integration, modelling of power electronics converter, advanced control for power converter etc. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Smart Power electronics solution for renewable energy, grid integration, transportation system etc.
  • New circuitry of a power converter with high voltage and current conversion capability
  • High stability solution for power electronics converter.
  • Advanced voltage/current control technique for power converter.
  • Modelling of the power conversion unit.
  • Isolated and non-isolated converter.
  • Multilevel structured power electronics converter.
  • Smart placement of reactive components and semiconductor devices.
  • Dynamics of the power converter.
  • Power circuitry of High step-up power converter.

16: Machine Vision, Control and Navigation

  • Oleg Sergiyenko, Engineering Institute of Autonomous University of Baja California, Mexico
  • Julio C. Rodríguez-Quiñonez, Engineering Faculty of Autonomous University of Baja California, Mexico
  • Wendy Flores-Fuentes, Engineering Faculty of Autonomous University of Baja California, Mexico

The integration of machine vision, navigation algorithms, communication in robotic groups, and control has become an important challenge for autonomous robot navigation. Moreover, enhanced machine vision systems such as those developed through deep neural networks constantly provide new applications. Accordingly, it is an important task to determine the most effective approaches of machine vision. Although our primary interest is in automatic systems in all their aspects, several control, communication and navigation applications have close relations with these systems. Each contribution, applications or innovations, for any of these fields are welcome in this special session. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Autonomous navigation
  • Machine vision with deep learning
  • Laser scanning
  • Innovative solutions in stereo vision applications
  • Vision-based target detection and tracking
  • Visual servoing techniques in mobile robots
  • Visual control with constraints
  • Swarm robotics
  • Robot communication
  • Surface mapping and recognition

17: Challenges and solutions towards 100% power electronic converter-based power systems

  • Jose Luis Rueda, Delft Univeristy of Technology, Netherlands
  • Francisco Gonzalez-Longatt, University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway

Power systems are currently facing major challenges as never before, one of them is the transition from large directly coupled synchronous generators (SGs) to smaller generation units, interfaced via power electronic converters (PECs) connected to different types of devices, including renewable energy based generation, energy storage, and demand. Due to the physical characteristics of these devices and the fact that they are typically connected via PECs to the system, their interaction with the traditional power system is substantially different from the interaction of the traditional plants that use steam and hydro turbines. For instance, one of the substantial differences is related to the capacity of response to power imbalances. Many of the challenges related to future power systems with low-inertia and low short circuit power have been highlighted in the scientific literature in recent times. However, as the penetration of PEC-interfaced generation units is increasing in the power system several aspects require more research. This special session is looking into challenges and solutions to of nearly 100% power converter-based power systems. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Challenges and solution of power system stability in nearly 100% power electronic converter-based power systems.
    • Addressing the modelling and control design needs to tackle coupling between different stability phenomena.
    • Needs for multi-physics simulation of PECs models
  • Use of co-simulation: Single and multiple domain
  • Grid-Forming Control Strategies: virtual inertia emulation, droop control, matching control, virtual oscillator, etc.
    • Distributed control and coordination of control between transmission and distribution
    • Operational challenges and solutions for integration of PECs in weak AC transmission network.
  • Impact of measurement quality and time delays on the performance of the outer controllers attached to PECs (e.g. PLL and PLL-less solutions).
  • Power balance and voltage control in systems with 100% PEC-interfaced generation units, storage, and demand.
  • Operation of nearly 100% power electronic converter-based power systems under different geographical levels of inertia.
  • Security constrained long term planning of nearly 100% power electronic converter-based power systems.
  • Technology-dependent challenges/solutions in low inertia systems:
    • Smart charging and electric vehicles (EV) to the grid.
    • Wind power plant (WPP) and wind turbines generator (WTG): local solutions and wide-area solutions.
    • Battery energy storage system (BESS): new tendencies in planning, operation and control.
    • Flywheel (FW)
    • Ultracapacitors (UC)
    • Pumped hydro storage (PHS), Compressed air energy storage (CAES), etc.
    • HVDC interconnectors
  • Measures to mitigate the resulting degradation of power quality due to harmonics propagation in nearly 100% power electronic converter-based power systems
  • Necessity to upgrade existing protection schemes in in nearly 100% power electronic converter-based power systems

18: Z-Source Converters; Topologies, Modulation and Control Strategies, and their Applications

  • Ebrahim Babaei, University of Tabriz, Iran
  • Hasan Komurcugil, Eastern Mediterranean University, Cyprus

Z-SOURCE CONVERTERS provide efficient means for electric power conversion (dc–dc, dc–ac, ac–dc, ac–ac) between source and load in a wide range of applications. Z-source converters have been experiencing, in terms of research and applications, a constant growth during the last 15 years. The efforts of research have led to a rapid development of different Z-source converter topologies, modulation techniques, and control strategies. Nevertheless, many interesting aspects, such as efficiency improvement, optimized parameters, and new applications, still require more investigation. We encourage all researchers working in this area to submit papers to this Special Session. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • New Z-source converter topologies;
  • Z-source based (dc-dc, dc-ac, ac-dc, matrix, multilevel, …) converters;
  • New modulation and control strategies for Z-Source converters;
  • Industrial applications of Z-Source converters;
  • Z-Source converters for renewable energy applications;
  • Z-Source converters for electric vehicles and motor drives applications;
  • Parameters optimization;
  • Loss analysis and losses minimization methods;
  • Reliability issues;
  • Review and challenges on Z-Source converters.

19: Internet of Things (IoT) and Wireless Sensors

  • Vijay B Gadicha, Nagpur Institute of Technology, Nagpur, India
  • Ajay B. Gadicha, P.R.Pote College of Engineering and Management, Amravati, India
  • Roshan R. Bhure, P.R.Pote College of Engineering and Management, Amravati, India

Internet of Things (IoT) is a promising research topic with prosperous industrial trend. In addition to the basic idea of bringing things or objects into the Internet, there are various approaches that are based on WSN. With the advancement in wearable devices industry, the increasing potential of smart homes and environments and the continuous requirement for personalization and context-aware applications, WSNs enter a new technological era and contribute to several new sensing products and applications (e.g. body sensors for medical surveillance, wireless visual sensors for environmental monitoring, WSNs in smart roads for intelligent traffic management and roads safety, wireless sensors in wearable devices, speed and motion sensors in personal devices, light and noise sensors in smart phones and tablets). In parallel, WSN will be used in the wider context of IoT. Thus, new architectures spanning the interactions between cloud services, smart devices and distributed sensors are evolving, which enable new business models and deployments of sensors to enhance user benefit. While continuous improvements are addressing specific WSN issues spanning hardware, new devices, network protocols, WSNs deployment architectures, operating systems, and applications, several research areas are still emerging from new needs and challenges. Integration of low powered WSN sensors into IoT will be a major evolution of WSNs. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • IoT Applications for eHealth, smart cities etc.
  • New architectures for WSNs and IoT
  • WSNs hardware and new devices
  • Low-power wireless technologies
  • WSNs new protocols
  • Wireless ad hoc Sensor networks
  • Routing and data transfer in WSNs
  • Multicast communication in WSNs
  • Security management in WSNs and in IoT systems
  • Power consumption optimization in WSNs
  • Prototypes for new applications for WSNs and IoT
  • Platforms and developments tools for WSNs and IoT
  • Programming models for sensors
  • Languages and operating systems of Sensors
  • Multi-purpose WSNs
  • WSNs trends on data gathering, processing, and communication
  • Distributed smart cameras/smart camera networks
  • IoT technologies
  • Sensing applications.

20: High-Power Converters: Topologies, Modulation Techniques, and Applications

  • Ebrahim Babaei, University of Tabriz, Iran
  • Hasan Komurcugil, Eastern Mediterranean University, Cyprus
  • Hadi Y. Kanaan, Saint-Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon

With technology advancements in semiconductor devices such as integrated gate commutated thyristors (IGCTs) and high voltage insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs), modern high-power medium voltage drives are increasingly used in transportation, traction, steel and metals, mining, petrochemical, and other industries to conserve electric energy. The effort of the researchers and demand of industry have led to a rapid development of high power converters, modulation techniques and control strategies, and practical drive configurations. In addition, traction converters at DC mains and AC mains, efficiency improvement, and new applications have been attracting many researchers and industry experts. We encourage all researchers and engineers working in this area to submit papers which involve recent advancements, and new trends in topologies, modulation techniques and applications of high-power converters to this Special Section. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Technical Requirements and Challenges;
  • High-Power Semiconductor Devices;
  • Operation of Series Connected Devices;
  • Operation of Parallel Connected Devices;
  • High Power AC Drives;
  • Multi-module Cascaded Matrix Converters;
  • Transformerless Medium Voltage Converters;
  • High Power Multilevel Converters;
  • High Power Z-Source Converters.

21: Charging electric vehicles from renewable energy and ultrafast charging of EV

  • Gautham Ram Chandra Mouli, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • Thiago Batista Soeiro, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • Pavol Bauer, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

The special session will focus on the design of power electronic converter and their intelligent control for charging electric vehicles from renewable energy sources and ultra-fast charging of electric vehicles. Key technological advancements are happening in on-board AC chargers and off-board DC chargers for electric vehicles where achieving high power density and high efficiency through the use of wide bandgap semiconductor devices is vital. The use of bidirectional power converter topologies for the EV charger will allow the EVs to support the grid through ancillary services. The modularity of the converter design is an essential design criterion for scalable ultra-fast charging solutions for EVs. Algorithms for smart charging will allow the EV to be used as a storage buffer for renewable energy sources, provide grid support and reduce the peak demand on the distribution network. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Integration of Renewable Energy sources for EVs charging
  • Charging technologies, including regular (<22kW), fast (<150kW) and ultra charging (<900kW)
  • AC-DC, DC-DC power converters for ultra-fast EV charging
  • Multiport converters for EV charging from renewable energy sources
  • Bidirectional power converters for vehicle-to-grid
  • Smart charging algorithms for charging electric vehicles from renewable energy
  • Charging control and management for ultra-fast charging

22: Fault Tolerant Converters for Medium and Low Voltage Applications

  • Pradyumn Chaturvedi, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, India
  • Vijay B. Borghate, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, India
  • P. Sanjeevikumar, Aalborg Unversity, Denmark
  • Jens Bo Holm-Nielsen, Aalborg Unversity, Denmark

Different fault tolerant converter topologies, modulation techniques with high power density are being researched and developed. Reliability is the main concern in applications such as more electric aircraft, renewable energy generation, automotive applications, uninterruptible power supply, high voltage dc transmission, grid integration and space applications etc. Therefore, the fault tolerant capability with reduction of power losses and optimized control strategies are attracting attention of researchers. Due to the complex control scheme and need to control more redundant switches, demand is to develop new converters with reduced device count providing single switch and multi-switch fault tolerant capability which can provide good power quality as well. This special session aims to cover various fault tolerant converter topologies with their modulation strategies for various medium voltage and low voltage applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Topologies/Configurations of fault tolerant converters for various low voltage and medium voltage applications such as Electric Drives, DVR, STATCOM, FACTS, HVDC transmission, etc.
  • Fault detection/diagnosis techniques,
  • Reliability and stability analysis of fault tolerant converters,
  • Fault tolerant control techniques,
  • Impact of fault tolerant operation on the power density of the converter system,
  • System identification algorithms for power electronic converters,
  • Fault probability assessment for power and control circuits,
  • Thermal control and power routing in fault tolerant power electronic converter system,
  • Practical design and experimental validation of fault-tolerant converters with all types of faults.